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Flanders Fields
June 22, 2015

Joined: May 9, 2014
Posts: 9
Flanders Fields

June 22, 2015

I have recently returned from Ieper (Ypres) having spent a few days there whilst visiting the grave of my great uncle Patrick Fitzsimmons, attending where he fell KIA on the 16th of June 1915.   It may be of interest to the military historians among you that there has been considerable controversy over the wrongly identified remains of 14 year old Pte John Condon, Royal Irish Regiment.   It is reputed to be the grave of the youngest soldier KIA in WW1.   However, I have incontrovertible proof from a battlefield archivist (and his director) that the IWGC (now CWGC) made an error in their records of 1923.   It is the mortal remains of 6322 Patrick Fitzsimmons of 2nd Bn Royal Irish Rifles.   The following link may catch your attention:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Condon_(British_Army_soldier).   

There is much information on the web and makes for interesting reading. 

Regards to all and well done Bob for keeping the site active.

Ken

 

 

June 23, 2015

Joined: May 8, 2014
Posts: 1203
Flanders Fields

June 23, 2015

Thanks Ken.......my other half has an Uncle K.I.A WW1  Danial O'Brien ...R>I>P> we have that to do in 2017 his centenary ,his grave is on the Somme .He did 3 years in the trenches before his demise in the winter 16/17 .many years ago I took my son around the WW1 battlefields from Ypers through Vimy ,Somme finishing of at Verdun .Looking at the landscape of those battles as an old tank commander you had to wonder what our in fact both sets of General officers had between their ears,I'm sure it wasn't brain matter. Most people have read the book on WW1 of ''Being led by donkeys '' to see how they lived and died yards apart in the mud of France and Belgium ...Very brave but stupid men on both sides , I don't mean that as a critic but as a modern man with military experience . Visiting Verdun they have a cathedral type building with red tinted windows all around the cellars,allowing people to look in an see  what is stored,if any body has done the catacomb in Paris were there are bones stored ,the French did the same at Verdun,but in each cellar window you only see ''one type of bone'' ,meaning skulls (thousands of them ) leg,arms you name the large bone they have cellars full .These are the bodies that rotted to nothing over the 4 years they fought their,believe it or not the cemetery is quite small........anyway it worth a visit just to relise how lucky our generation is

June 23, 2015

Joined: May 8, 2014
Posts: 1203
Flanders Fields

June 23, 2015

After I replied to Kens post i went through my photo album and got the name of the building housing the remains (bones ,skulls etc ) it was  called the ''Ossary'' .During our tour I found the graves of 6th Dragoon Guards around the various battlefields .....there was one valley which the British Army advanced on ,its nick name was ''catterpiller '' as it was sort of windy ....the small village in the center is surrounded by CWG   cemeteries which they tend with honor .What I'm going to do go through all my bunf /pics etc and will publish them if poss.....saying again ''we lucky few ,we band of brothers ''

June 26, 2015

Joined: April 23, 2014
Posts: 141
Flanders Fields

June 26, 2015

Bob etc if you google Ossuary Verdun there are stunning and quite disturbing pics of the chapel you mentioned. Ossuary means a place where skeletel remains are stored and this place is overwhelming on that score. Those like Bob who have been there will recall the absolute stillness of the place, no birdsong is heard.

July 1, 2015

Joined: May 8, 2014
Posts: 1203
Flanders Fields

July 1, 2015

Freddie I remember my first trip to Hohne back in 63 ,pissed in ''Snakepit'' missed transport back to tented camp on range 5 something ...walking back to camp passed Belsen camp was very scary even for an eighteen year old.....later posted to Hohne would take family out there ,no birds or noise just silence!!!!!!!


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